Far From Perfect

Posts tagged spring

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Black Diamond and Opal Pools on Flickr.


Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY
Used a dual technique here to bring out the steam rising from the pools as well as the detail in the landscape. Initially I saw the thin wisps of steam on the pool and wanted to capture it. I stacked a 0.9 ND filter and CPL to get 5 stops and shot some slow shutter exposures. At the same time I bracketed the shots just to experiment with HDR. The combination of the two techniques created this surreal almost other worldly look at the Black Diamond and Opal Pools in Yellowstone.

Black Diamond and Opal Pools on Flickr.

Biscuit Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY

Used a dual technique here to bring out the steam rising from the pools as well as the detail in the landscape. Initially I saw the thin wisps of steam on the pool and wanted to capture it. I stacked a 0.9 ND filter and CPL to get 5 stops and shot some slow shutter exposures. At the same time I bracketed the shots just to experiment with HDR. The combination of the two techniques created this surreal almost other worldly look at the Black Diamond and Opal Pools in Yellowstone.

Filed under 2012 Camera Clouds D7000 HDR Landscape Lightroom Nature Nikon Photo Photography Photomatix Pool Processing RAW Season Sky Spring Tonemapped Yellowstone wyoming park

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Lady of the Lake
KB-29B (s/n 44-83905)  “Lady Of The Lake” Eielson AFB, AK 
From the pamphlet:
"In 1957 the B-29s were replaced by B-50s, a larger version of the B-29.  Although the two airplane models looked alike, most parts were not interchangeable. After World War II, most B-29s were cut up and scrapped, so the parts supply was rapidly dwindling. By the time the B-50s arrived, parts cannibalization on B-29s was standard practice, just to keep the remaining planes flying.
The “Lady of the Lake” was one such aircraft. With all the useful parts removed, and with no chance of replacement, the plane was removed from the active aircraft inventory. At that time, almost all of the flights originating out of Eielson AFB were reconnaissance flights traveling over open water, either over the Arctic Ocean, or the North Pacific Ocean. Someone thought of using the grounded WB-29 for open water extraction practice.
The plane was hauled out to its present location via the railroad, and set up in a shallow pond for training purposes. Unfortunately, either because of raising water, or because the plane sank into the bottom of the pond, the water level became too high to continue the extraction training, and the plane was abandoned in place. Over the years, a certain mystic rose around the plane, and many different theories came about as to its origins, but the case of the “Lady in the Lake” has been closed for now.”
www.eielson.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-061114-019.pdf www.warbirdregistry.org/b29registry/b29-4483905.html
Lady of the Lake

KB-29B (s/n 44-83905) 
“Lady Of The Lake”
Eielson AFB, AK 

From the pamphlet:

"In 1957 the B-29s were replaced by B-50s, a larger version of the B-29.  Although the two airplane models looked alike, most parts were not interchangeable. After World War II, most B-29s were cut up and scrapped, so the parts supply was rapidly dwindling. By the time the B-50s arrived, parts cannibalization on B-29s was standard practice, just to keep the remaining planes flying.

The “Lady of the Lake” was one such aircraft. With all the useful parts removed, and with no chance of replacement, the plane was removed from the active aircraft inventory. At that time, almost all of the flights originating out of Eielson AFB were reconnaissance flights traveling over open water, either over the Arctic Ocean, or the North Pacific Ocean. Someone thought of using the grounded WB-29 for open water extraction practice.

The plane was hauled out to its present location via the railroad, and set up in a shallow pond for training purposes. Unfortunately, either because of raising water, or because the plane sank into the bottom of the pond, the water level became too high to continue the extraction training, and the plane was abandoned in place. Over the years, a certain mystic rose around the plane, and many different theories came about as to its origins, but the case of the “Lady in the Lake” has been closed for now.”

www.eielson.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-061114-019.pdf www.warbirdregistry.org/b29registry/b29-4483905.html

Filed under 2012 Alaska Camera D7000 Fairbanks Field HDR Lake Landscape Lightroom Muskeg Nature Nikon Photo Photography Photomatix Processing Season Spring Swamp Tonemapped